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Cite-Checking and Source Guide for the Connecticut Journal of International Law

This guide is meant to be a starting place for the source and cite checkers of the CJIL. Finding International and Foreign Law materials can be difficult. Please consult a Reference Librarian if this guide does not help you find what you are looking for.

Tips

Verifying Citations

  • You need to verify the accuracy of the citation in order to find  the source.
  • Always remember that the author’s citation is not necessarily accurate. Be aware that names be wrong, titles may be wrong, volume number, page numbers, dates, document numbers, URLs, etc., etc. – any or all may be inaccurate.
  • Using the abbreviations in the citation (even if correct) will not help you locate sources in most search engines and databases.  You need to understand what the abbreviation stands for in full and use the full title of the source in order to locate the source for the citation.
  • Remember that you can also use published journal articles, books, case digests and indices to try to determine the proper citation for source. 
  • Please remember that if you have problems, you can consult a Reference librarian.

Deciphering Citations - Primary Sources

Use the following to help you to decipher the full title of the primary source that is being cited:

Non-legal foreign and international secondary sources:

  • For journals, use Ulrich's Periodicals Directory - Electronic - NetID may be required - Use the advanced search to narrow by language, by subject,  to find journals that have ceased publication, etc.
  • For newpapers, use Lexis.com - log into Lexis Advance then click on research tab and click on Lexis.com then News & Business tab.
  • For books or parts of books, use WorldCat - You can use author, title or any other information the author has given you to try to decipher the citation.

Deciphering Citations - Legal Secondary Sources

Use the following (if not found in the titles above) to help you to decipher the full title of the secondary source that is being cited:

Deciphering Citations - Non-Legal & International Secondary Sources

Use the following (if not found in the titles above) to help you to decipher the full title of the secondary source that is being cited:

  • For journals, use Ulrich's Periodicals Directory - NetID may be required - Use the advanced search to narrow by language, by subject,  to find journals that have ceased publication, etc.
  • For newpapers, use Lexis.com - log into Lexis Advance then click on research tab and click on Lexis.com then News & Business tab.
  • For books or parts of books, use WorldCat - You can use author, title or any other information the author has given you to try to decipher the citation.

Tips

URLs

  • Some things that used to be available on the web are not now available on the web.  If an author gives you a URL for a source that you cannot now find, you can useThe Internet Archive Wayback Machine to see if you can find a copy of that URL:

Subject Guide